She Knits: Icy Lattice Socks

These are probably my new favorite hand-knit socks. 🙂 The fit is very close to perfect and the pattern was fun to knit.

Pattern Info:
Maeva Socks by Stefanie Bold
Ravelry

The cable/twist pattern on the foot is beautiful, and I really like it. It was fun, though fiddly, to knit. I had to read the chart for each round while working the first sock, but had the design pretty well figured out for the second sock. Therefore, the second foot knit up much faster.

Disappointingly, I ran across three errors in the pattern while working the first sock. I quickly spied the first two and was able to adjust as I knit the first sock, but the third error I did not notice quickly enough. The three mistakes I found are:  (1) the first two purl stitches were left off of the right side of chart 3b; (2) on chart 3b, round 29, the second kbl is missing in the gusset increase section; and (3) the faux rib columns in the gusset section of chart 3b do not line up with the columns on the leg chart 5b (the first column of seed stitch on 3b needs to be moved one column to the right). I noticed the third error when I began knitting from the leg chart–the chart did not line up with my knitting! I soon figured out which chart was wrong (3b–the one I’d already knit, of course). I had to drop 3 stitches down about 15 rounds and hook them back up in pattern to fix the error. It was not a difficult correction, but was tedious to do.

I left comments on the Ravelry pattern page about these errors, as those comments are sent directly to the designer. She replied to the first (about the two purl stitches), but never replied to my other comments. As of 11/26/2012, none of these errors have been corrected (PDF download version). I don’t want to disrespect the designer in any way by posting them here, but knitters who may want to knit this pattern should be aware of the errors.

Lastly, I altered the calf-shaping to fit my calves better. As written, the leg was too skinny. Since I wanted to knit them longer, I had to add stitches either way. Here are my alterations:

  1. On chart 5b, on the third repeat of rounds 11-12, on round 12, I increased in the center of the first & third k6 columns, increasing with a YO and then knitting the YO through the back loop on the following round (70 sts).
  2. On chart 5b, on the tenth repeat of rounds 11-12, on round 12, I increased in the center of the second & fourth k6 columns, increasing as before (72 sts). This makes all plain columns 7 stitches wide with 2-stitch-wide seed stitch columns between.
  3. I finished the 14 repeats of rounds 11-12. I then worked 14 more rounds, increasing in the seed stitch columns, as follows (ending with 8 columns of 7 knit stitches and 8 columns of 5 seed stitches; total 96 sts):

Rnd 1: k3, (k1, p1, yo, k7, k1, p1, k7) 3 times, k1, p1, yo, k7, k1, p1, k4 (76 sts)
Rnd 2: k3, (p1, k1, pbl, k7, p1, k1, k7) 3 times, p1, k1, pbl, k7, p1, k1, k4
Rnd 3: k3, (k1, p1, k1, k7, k1, p1, k7) 3 times, k1, p1, k1, k7, k1, p1, k4
Rnd 4: k3, (p1, k1, p1, k7, p1, k1, k7) 3 times, p1, k1, p1, k7, p1, k1, k4
Rnd 5: k3, (k1, p1, k1, k7, k1, p1, yo, k7) 3 times, k1, p1, k1, k7, k1, p1, yo, k4 (80 sts)
Rnd 6: k3, (p1, k1, p1, k7, p1, k1, pbl, k7) 3 times, p1, k1, p1, k7, p1, k1, pbl, k4
Rnd 7: k3 (k1, p1, k1, k7) 7 times, k1, p1, k1, k4
Rnd 8: k3, (p1, k1, p1, k7) 7 times, p1, k1, p1, k4
Rnd 9: k3, (k1, p1, k1, yo, k7) 7 times, k1, p1, k1, yo, k4 (88 sts)
Rnd 10: k3, (p1, k1, p1, kbl, k7) 7 times, p1, k1, p1, kbl, k4
Rnd 11: k3, (k1, p1, k1, p1, k7) 7 times, k1, p1, k1, p1, k4
Rnd 12: k3, (p1, k1, p1, k1, k7) 7 times, p1, k1, p1, k1, k4
Rnd 13: k3, (yo, k1, p1, k1, p1, k7) 7 times, yo, k1, p1, k1, p1, k4 (96 sts)
Rnd 14: k3, (kbl, p1, k1, p1, k1 k7) 7 times, kbl, p1, k1, p1, k1, k4

I then knit 15 rounds of plain 1×1 ribbing and bound off with Jeny’s Surprisingly Stretchy Bind-Off. I used this nifty TECHknitting trick for binding off pieces worked in the round. The foot turned out about 1/4-inch too long. If I were to knit this again, I would knit one less pattern repeat (6 rounds) on the foot before beginning the gusset increases. Otherwise, the short-row heel and heel-flap fit beautifully and were a breeze to knit.

Yarn Info:
Knit Picks Stroll Heather
75% superwash merino wool, 25% nylon
Wonderland Heather

This yarn is beautiful. I think it is my favorite sock yarn. I have some of the “old” Stroll (use for my Rippling Ribs Socks) that is not nearly as soft as this stuff, which I presume means they have changed their base yarn or something. At any rate, these socks are incredibly soft, machine-washable, beautifully colored, and amazing to wear. Perfect. I’ve worn these socks once and washed them twice, so can’t say much about how they wear, but they look as good after one wash as they did newly knit up. Can you tell that I really love this yarn?

Photos:
It was difficult to get good pictures of  these socks. I think it had something to do with the color–sunlight completely washed out the twisty-, cabley-goodness, so I ended up taking the pictures inside (where it is too dark) and brightening them on the computer. Sorry for the quality, but it’s the best I can do! Click on any image to view it larger.

 

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “She Knits: Icy Lattice Socks

    • It is a really neat design, but you may want to look over the pattern before you begin, just to check for mistakes. I made the size 10.5, so I don’t know if there are mistakes in the smaller sizes.

  1. Pingback: A Year of Crafting: 2012 | Beloved Brown-Eyed Girl

  2. Pingback: She Knits: Pearlescent Socks | Beloved Brown-Eyed Girl

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s